One of the requirements for obtaining your BSc in Applied Accounting from Oxford Brookes University (OBU) is submitting a Research and Analysis Project (RAP). For this OBU requires the involvement of a Project Mentor that is registered with OBU, ensuring a level of confidence in the knowledge and skills of that individual.

The first step is to search the Directory of Mentors and identify a couple of suitable options. My suggestion would be to get in touch with the short-listed mentors and have a brief discussion with them about how they work and how well do they fit to your style.

I strongly believe there has to be a match between mentor and mentee to ensure a successful relation.

You should focus on a couple of characteristics that will ensure you can establish a bridge. From my perspective the most vital traits are:

  • Openness: A mentor should be ready to listen to your opinions and ideas and understand that each mentee has his own style and approach
  • Fair: There is no point on playing hide-and-seek. The mentor should have the strength to recognize work well done and in the same time have the strength to communicate when things should be better
  • Supportive: The entire research work is complex and each mentee has a different way of doing it. Your mentor should be there to support you when you go through a motivational low and help you remember why you are doing it.
  • Challenging: There is no right or wrong solution, there is always space for discussion and assessing different paths. A right mentor should be willing to challenge your ideas, help you make a list of options and act as a sound-board for debating them.
  • Holding you accountable: At the end of the day the mentee is the one being evaluated by OBU. Your work has to be at the highest level of quality. Your mentor should be ready to remind you of that and push you to reach your potential.

 

“A mentor is not someone who walks ahead of us to show us how they did it. A mentor walks alongside us to show us what we can do.” – Simon Sinek

 

A genuine desire to help and see their mentees succeed is what makes a great mentor. That is definitely the key to my success.